Monday, September 27, 2010

Book Review: Immortal

Immortal Immortal is probably the modern (and historical) fantasy you've been seeking

By the end of the first chapter I was fairly convinced that Gene Doucette had found this manuscript between seats on the subway because it had clearly been written as a collaboration by some of my favorite authors while they were sharing a bottle of whiskey. He has the wit of Douglas Adams, the sarcasm of Jim Butcher, the droll plotting of Spider Robinson, and the sly twists of Neil Gaiman, just to mention a few. But don't think that this means he seems imitative because he doesn't. "Immortal" was clever, fascinating, and endlessly entertaining.

I'm tempted to quote all the clever parts (which I highlighted because they were that good) but will let you discover them for yourself. As an example, one of my favorite bits from the first chapter: "I was suicidal for two solid centuries once. That was during the early part of what they now call the Dark Ages, in medieval Europe. Suicidal tendencies were de rigueur at the time, and I’m nothing if not trendy."

If there is a God, which is something that main character Adam sincerely doubts, then Mr. Doucette will write a series and get a TV show.

GoodReads links:

ImmortalImmortal by Gene Doucette

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

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